Technology Driving Precision Medicine

Co-Located with Molecular Med TRI-CON Asia

May 28-31, 2013
Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

 

Day 1 | Day 2 | Download Brochure 

Friday, May 31

8:30 Morning Coffee


» KEYNOTE SESSION 

8:50 Chairperson’s Remarks

Stanley Y. Shaw, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Director, Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); Co-Director of Chemical Biology, MGH Center for Systems Biology; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

 

9:00 Genome 10K: A Genomic Zoo of 10,000 Vertebrates

Byrappa VenkateshProf. B. Venkatesh, Ph.D., Research Director, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR

Genome 10K is an ambitious project which aims to catalogue genome sequences of 10,000 vertebrates across mammals, birds, non-avian reptiles, amphibians and fishes. These sequences would be a valuable resource to gain insights into the genetic basis of morphological diversity, adaptation and response to environmental changes. The project would also help in formulating guidelines for assessment, monitoring and conservation of biodiversity. I will be discussing the strategy, progress and challenges of the Genome 10K project.
 

9:45 The Human Protein Atlas - An Update with Emphasis on the Contribution of Indian Surgical Pathology

Sanjay NavaniSanjay Navani, M.D., Surgical Pathologist and Immunohistochemist, LAB SURGPATH; Site Director, The Human Protein Atlas (HPA) Project

The Human Protein Atlas (HPA) program (www.proteinatlas.org) is an international program that has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified (mono-specific) antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues/cell types assembled in tissue microarrays. A brief overview with a current update emphasizing the Indian contribution is provided.

 

10:30 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing



INTEGRATING GENOMICS AND CLINICAL INFORMATICS 

11:20 Chairperson's Remarks

Stanley Y. Shaw, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Director, Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); Co-Director of Chemical Biology, MGH Center for Systems Biology; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

11:30 Data Mining of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Other Novel Phenotypes for Biomedical Discovery

Stanley ShawStanley Y. Shaw, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Director, Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); Co-Director of Chemical Biology, MGH Center for Systems Biology; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Despite our growing genetic understanding of many diseases, we have limited capacity to use this understanding to interpret human wellness and disease. New quantitative measurements of human traits (phenotypes), together with integrative analytics, may improve genotype-phenotype correlations and also improve patient care. New phenotypes may arise from many sources, including data mining of Electronic Medical Records (EMR), continuous physiologic and behavioral sensors, and novel measurements. When analytically integrated with other data types, such as patient outcomes and genotype, these “next generation phenotypes” can provide insights that advance biomedical discovery and patient care.

12:00 Novel Cancer Bioinformatics and Data Analysis Strategies for Identification of Clinically Related BiomarkerVladimir Kuznetsovs

Vladimir A. Kuznetsov, Ph.D., Sci.D., Deputy Director, Graduate Affairs; Senior Principal Investigator & Head, Division of Genome and Gene Expression Data Analysis, Bioinformatics Institute

 

12:30 Lunch on Your Own


CANCER BIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS 

13:45 Chairperson’s Remarks

Stanley Y. Shaw, M.D., Ph.D., Co-Director, Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); Co-Director of Chemical Biology, MGH Center for Systems Biology; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

13:50 Cancer Metabolism Revisited

Kishore BhakooKishore Bhakoo, Ph.D., Director, Translational Imaging Industrial Laboratory (TIIL) ; Head, Translational Molecular Imaging Group (TMIG), Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)

 

14:10 Oncomir-138: A Potential Prognostic Biomarker for Malignant Gliomas

Prabha Sampath, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Translational Control in Disease and Development Group, Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR

Malignant gliomas comprising of anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme are the most aggressive forms of brain tumors associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Recurrence and tumorigenesis are attributed to a sub-population of tumor-initiating glioma stem cells (GSCs) that are intrinsically resistant to therapy. We have identified microRNA-138 (miR-138), as a molecular signature of GSCs and demonstrate a vital role for miR-138 to promote growth and survival of bona fide tumor-initiating cells with self-renewal potential. Higher expression of miR-138 in GSCs compared to non-neoplastic tissue and association with tumor-recurrence and survival highlights the clinical significance of miR-138 as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for treatment of malignant gliomas.

14:40 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

15:10 Molecular Classification of Gastro Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

Lakshmi Muthuswamy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Gastro Esophageal adenocarcinoma is the seventh deadliest cancers with less than a 10% 5-year survival rate. Advances in recent study suggests that GE adenocarcinoma can be classified as adenocarcinoma of oesophagus, GEJ, and gastric when they originate either above, at, or below the GE junction respectively. A major problem in classifying upper gastro-intestinal cancers is the lack of a universally-accepted and clearly reproducible anatomic landmark separating the gastric cardia from the distal oesophagus. Even when the landmarks are defined, cancer frequently destroys the anatomy to the extent that the landmarks become unrecognizable. Therefore, uncertainty or misclassification of GE cancers occurs frequently. We discuss here the potential to use genomic mutations and DNA methylation signatures as biomarkers for a better classification of these cancers.

15:30 Therapeutic Potential and Pitfalls of Sequence-Specific Chromatin Targeting

Fabian A. Buske, Ph.D., Research Officer, Cancer-Epigenetics, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Aging populations are putting an increasing pressure on the healthcare systems of developed societies.
New medical approaches are required to ease the financial burden on future generations and keep elderly residents self-sufficient.
Projects such as the The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and the 10,000 vertebrate genomes advance our understanding of the genomic layers at an unprecedented pace.
These insights in conjunction with the patients genome sequence enable a personalized medicine, e.g. by employing the drug that is likely to show the most beneficial outcome for the patient. In this talk, I outline the potential and challenges of personalized therapies that go beyond the recommendation of a conventional, symptom-focused drug treatment but instead aims to treat the responsible genomic layer directly and have therefore the potential to prevent (age-related) diseases even before the first symptoms manifest.

15:50 Targeted Gene Knockdown for Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in Cancer

Md. EzharulHoqueChowdhury, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Sunway Campus)

Unveiling the molecular mechanisms for cancer drug resistance has now paved the way to design a number of approaches to facilitate the reversal of drug resistance for effective cancer treatment. Considering the tremendous potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a powerful tool for specific knockdown of desirable target gene(s), the recent progress on identification and validation of the vital genes directly or indirectly involved in development of cancer drug resistance will be highlighted.

16:10 End of Conference



Day 1 | Day 2 | Download Brochure