Technology Driving Precision Medicine

Co-Located with Molecular Med TRI-CON Asia

May 28-31, 2013
Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

 

Topics to be covered in this track may include archive and storage solutions for big data in life science, big data transfer, data sharing and collaboration for life sciences research, as well as high performance computing in the Cloud.

Day 1 | Day 2 | Download Brochure 

Tuesday, May 28

7:30 Conference Registration and Morning Coffee

8:30 Conference Welcome

8:40 Chairperson's Remarks

Chris Dagdigian, Founding Partner and Director, Technology, BioTeam, Inc.

8:50 Keynote Introduction

Jay Migliaccio, Director, Cloud Products & Solutions, Aspera, Inc.

 

» Plenary Keynote Session: Molecular Medicine Asia  

9:00 New Cancer Drugs that Target Protein-Protein Interactions

David LaneSir David Lane, Ph.D., Professor & Chief Scientist, A*STAR; Director, p53 Laboratory

The search for new targets for drug discovery that has emerged from the cancer genome project has highlighted the need for novel drugs that can disrupt protein-protein interactions. Two such molecules are now in clinical trials from Roche and Abbott. Novel methods of developing such inhibitors include the development of stapled peptides and new peptidomimetics. The challenges of developing this exciting new class of medicines will be discussed with reference to the action of Mdm2 inhibitors that activate the p53 pathway and the action pro-apoptotic BH3 mimetics that induce apoptosis.

9:45 Study of Newborn Diseases with Evolving Genomic Technologies

Paul TamProfessor Paul Tam, Ph.D., Pro-Vice Chancellor and Vice President, The University of Hong KongMost of the rare, severe, congenital genetic disorders are caused by rare deleterious DNA variants in either coding (CDS) or non-coding genomic sequences (NCDS) or, by pathological structural variations (Copy Number Variations –CNV-/chromosomal abnormalities) affecting one or more genes as well as regulatory regions.  Such disorders occur mainly sporadically and can only result from recessively inherited or de novo DNA lesions in the affected individuals.  De novo alterations explain why rare, devastating disorders that compromise the reproductive fitness of the patient still occur.  The use of high-density SNP chips and next generation sequencing for the discovery of genomic lesions underlying congenital disorders will be presented.

 

10:30 Coffee Break
 

BIO-IT ESSENTIALS  

11:20 Chairperson’s Remarks

Chris Dagdigian, Founding Partner and Director, Technology, BioTeam, Inc.
 

11:30 Life Science Informatics & The Cloud: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

Chris DagdigianChris Dagdigian, Founding Partner and Director, Technology, BioTeam, Inc.

This presentation will cover practical aspects of conducting discovery-oriented scientific computing on public IaaS cloud platforms. There are many vendors, service providers and cloud operators excitedly talking up their own platforms for cloud HPC -- this talk will take a slightly different path and will focus exclusively on the research end-user and ultimate consumer of cloud services. Dagdigian will candidly discuss mistakes, hard lessons learned and best practices learned from many years of science-based cloud work.

 

Aspera 12:00 Big Data in the Cloud: A New Age of Collaboration for Life Sciences

Jay Migliaccio AsperaJay Migliaccio, Director, Cloud Products & Solutions, Aspera, Inc.

The international scientific research community continues to demand tools to support global research and collaboration. This talk will focus on innovative cloud based software technology from Aspera that enables global collaboration. Asperas solution is a suite of web based applications that provide researchers worldwide with high speed, secure access to data with simple intuitive application interfaces.

 

12:30 Lunch on Your Own


IT INFRASTRUCTURE FOR GENOMIC RESEARCH  

14:00 Chairperson’s Remarks

Clive Higgins, Vice President, Marketing, Informatics, PerkinElmer

 

14:10 The Australian Genomics Virtual Laboratory

Andrew LonieAndrew Lonie, Ph.D., Associate Professor & Head, Life Sciences Computation Center, Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative

The Australian Genomics Virtual Laboratory (GVL) is a combination of scalable genomics infrastructure, analysis platforms, resources, and support being implemented at multiple physical nodes around Australia. Researchers can access one of the centrally managed nodes of the GVL to directly perform genomic analyses and visualization, with large resource/support allocations available through subscriptions; alternatively research groups or institutes may instantiate, manage and tailor their own workflow platform on nationally funded public cloud infrastructure.

Cray14:30 Building Bridges: Evolving High Performance Computing in the Life Sciences

Carlos SosaCarlos P. Sosa, Ph.D., Manager, Chemistry & Life Sciences Segment, Cray, Inc.; Biomedical Informatics & Computational Biology, University of Minnesota Rochester

As the life sciences community enters the age of data intensive science, knowledge discovery rests upon storing, moving and analyzing massive amounts of data that cross organizational, geographic and domain-specific boundaries. Current technologies and standard approaches to management and interpretation are breaking down as the volume and complexity of data increase. Cray builds innovative solutions enabling scientists and engineers in academia, government and industry to meet existing and future simulation and analytics challenges. Our comprehensive portfolio of solutions for data-intensive computing, graph analytics and data management deliver unrivaled sustained performance, usability and reliability. Combined with an intimate understanding of the high performance marketplace, Cray is uniquely positioned to provide customers with differentiated advantages.

15:00 Refreshment Break

15:30 Translational Research Infrastructure for Genome Medicine in the NGS Era

Adam YaoAdam Yao, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Director, BioIT Group, National Center for Genome Medicine (NCGM), Institute of Biomedical Sciences (IBMS), Academia Sinica

My group has been constructing and maintaining IT infrastructure for translational research projects and related core facilities since 2003. The infrastructure covers from upstream data management systems such as genotyping LIMS, e-CRF, and sample management systems to downstream data analysis systems such as an NGS analysis pipeline. The pipeline using BWA and GATK can finish mapping pair-end reads, detecting variants, and comprehensively annotating the variants from a re-sequenced human genome with 30x coverage in 8 hrs.

15:50 A Genomics Virtual Lab for Cancer Research

Dominique GorseDominique Gorse, Ph.D., MBA, MACS CT, General Manager, QFAB Bioinformatics, Australia

The Australian Genomics Virtual Laboratory provides research biologists and clinicians with an accessible computational data infrastructure that enables cancer researchers to access genomic datasets from multiple data sources and integrate them with their own clinical and genomic data in order to explore, discover and validate key genomic abnormalities that cause cancer. In addition to the  Galaxy workflow engine, the Australian Genomics Virtual Laboratory host a set of applications that automate the publication of dataset and workflow descriptions to the Research Data Australia discovery service. This facilitates the discoverability, minting, sharing and re-use of research data and bioinformatics workflows.

16:10 Implementing Hadoop NGS Mapping Framework SEAL in GIS

Seow Eng LeeSeow Eng Lee, Senior Application Engineer, Genome Institute of Singapore (A*STAR)

Hadoop framework ensures high reliability of the computing system together with high performances and becomes a popular framework for analyzing “big data”. We implemented a Hadoop NGS mapping framework in Genome Institute of Singapore using SEAL, which uses the original BWA code with duplicate read detection and removal. I will share our implementation experiences and the performance comparison with other non-Hadoop NGS mapping tools.

 

16:30 Panel Discussion: Democratizing Genomic Research

Moderator:

Carlos P. Sosa, Ph.D., Manager, Chemistry & Life Sciences Segment, Cray, Inc.; Biomedical Informatics & Computational Biology, University of Minnesota Rochester

Panelists:

Andrew Lonie, Ph.D., Associate Professor & Head, Life Sciences Computation Center, Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative

Adam Yao, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Director, BioIT Group, National Center for Genome Medicine (NCGM), Institute of Biomedical Sciences (IBMS), Academia Sinica

Dominique Gorse, Ph.D., M.B.A., MACS CT, General Manager, QFAB Bioinformatics, Australia

Lavanya Veeravalli, Bioinformatics Specialist, Genome Institute of Singapore

17:30 Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

18:30 Close of Day



Day 1 | Day 2 | Download Brochure